Q&A Program, ABC

 

TONY JONES:

Good evening I’m Tony Jones. Answering your questions tonight despite a heavy cold is the Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull. Please welcome our guest.

[APPLAUSE]

Malcolm Turnbull became Prime Minister last September promising clear economic leadership and a revitalised Government. He was welcomed by a wave of popularity and seemed to promise a landslide of voters but he's facing a very close election. Can Malcolm Turnbull win the sensible centre and return to power as Australia's elected Prime Minister? As usual you can watch Q&A live on ABC TV in the east, on News 24 in the centre and the west, and listen across Australia on News Radio. Tonight we're streaming Q&A live on our Facebook page where you can watch, comment and ask a question. Let's go to our first question it’s in the audience from Daniel Seed.

QUESTION:

The Coalition and Labor are trying to terrify the public about the danger of doing deals with the Greens. I'm not a Greens voter but I am more concerned about you doing deals with the far right of your own party that represent an even smaller number of voters than the Greens. Can you convince me to trust you when you've already been swayed on climate change, Safe Schools, Gonski, and marriage equality, by the ultra-conservative wing of your own Government?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well thank you for your question but I can tell you that all of our policies are out there and they're on the table. Our economic plan is set out in the Budget and in great detail. We do have an economic plan that responds to the challenges of Australia's circumstances today which are times of great opportunity but also great uncertainty, great head winds as well. So we do have a clear plan. As far as all the other policies you mentioned whether it is same-sex marriage or climate change my position has remained utterly consistent. On same-sex marriage which you touched on I support it. There will be a plebiscite after the election, assuming we win the election of course. It will be held as soon as practicable and I'll vote yes and encourage others to vote yes and I'm very confident it will be carried. As far as climate change is concerned we have agreed to substantial cuts in emissions together with the other leading economies of the world in the Paris Conference and we will meet them and have the means to meet them and are on track to meet them. I'm committed that we will and, as I'm sure the world will over the next few years, agree to higher targets. We will meet them too. The Paris Conference really changed everything in the climate change space. It was the first time the world came together with strong tangible targets. We have got strong targets. In fact, in the OECD, the second highest per capita emission cuts. They're substantial and we'll meet them.

TONY JONES:

Can I interrupt you for a moment. We will come to the details of some of those questions during the course of the program. Getting back to the point of the question, did you make any formal agreement with party conservatives when you were putting together the votes to overthrow Tony Abbott?

PRIME MINISTER:

Not at all. Look the position, the point that people raise with me is - let's cut to the chase rather than beating around the bush. They raised with me the issue of the plebiscite on same-sex marriage. Now that was not my idea. I'm a traditionalist. I'm a small ‘l’ Liberal and also in parliamentary terms a conservative. So my preference was to have it dealt with by a conscience vote, a free vote in the Parliament. Fair enough. Prior to my becoming PM the party room considered the matter, the Coalition party room considered the matter, and concluded there should be a people's vote, a plebiscite. That was adopted as the policy of the Government and that's, we went out and said to the Australian people and under Tony Abbott's Prime Ministership ‘every single one of you is going to get a say on this.’ You know what? About two-thirds of Australians think that's a fantastic idea.

TONY JONES:

I promise you we will come back to that question properly, but really I'm asking whether there was any deal done with conservatives in the party when you got the votes to overthrow Tony Abbott? Any formal or informal deal or arrangement?

PRIME MINISTER:

The only arrangement is in the Coalition agreement with the Nationals.

TONY JONES:

What does that state in terms of the issues that we're talking about?

PRIME MINISTER:

It states a commitment to the plebiscite which was the Government's policy. It also refers to committing, maintaining our position on climate change, which by the way I support. I mean I supported going to Paris with the 26 to 28 per cent cut in emissions. President Obama no less, recently - I spoke to him on the telephone - he thanked me for it and said it was a great contribution and thanked Australia for making it. So we shouldn’t sell ourselves short. As Australians we are our worst critics, our harshest critics in any event and we have made very substantial commitments. We're well on track to meeting, in fact we'll exceed the 2020 targets, and I believe we're on track - although it's a way off now - to meet 2030 as well. So that's the key thing. Look climate change is an issue that I take very, very seriously. I don't think any Australian doubts that. What we need to do is bring global emissions down. The thing that was so frustrating until Paris was that there was no global agreement in particular between China and the United States. Now we've got that and we are on track to actually reduce emissions. I believe we'll agree on higher targets at least by 2020 if not earlier. But we are well set-up to meet them and meet them we will.

TONY JONES:

Okay. The briefest of answers on this one. Are you suggesting if you had changed policy, that you might have threatened the Coalition because you had an agreement with the Nationals?

PRIME MINISTER:

No. I'm not suggesting that at all. The arrangement that we have with the National Party is - this is not, I haven't told you anything new, Tony, but it was very clear that the party had committed, the Coalition party room had committed and the Government had committed to there being a plebiscite. I remember saying to the advocates of a plebiscite at the time that once you offer it you will have to stick with it because it will be extremely popular - and it is. Two-thirds of Australians would rather have a say on this issue than leave it entirely to the politicians. For good or ill that's where we are. Every Australian will get a vote. I will be urging every Australian, encouraging every Australian, to vote yes because I do believe that gay people, people of the same sex should be able to get married just in the same way that Lucy and I have been for over 36 years.

TONY JONES:

The next question now and we will come back to that issue. The next question is from Glenn Wood.

QUESTION:

Good evening Prime Minister and welcome to Brisbane. A bit over six months ago the Liberal Party made you the Prime Minister on the promise that you weren't Tony Abbott -

[LAUGHTER]

PRIME MINISTER:

I think that was penetrating glimpse of the obvious.

QUESTION:

[LAUGHTER]

But the real problem is that in two weeks you hope to continue in the same position on the argument that you're not Malcolm Turnbull either. Are you?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well Glenn I'm 61 years of age. I've been a public figure one way or another for many years, for decades. I think every Australian knows who I am and knows what I stand for.

TONY JONES:

Let's move on. Another question now from Kerry Bridgeman.

QUESTION:

Good evening Prime Minister. Mathias Cormann was on ABC Television this morning promising no changes to Medicare. However the rumour is that it will be privatised just as Medibank was under a Liberal government previously. How can we trust what your party says after Tony Abbott famously promised no cuts to health, education, and no cuts to ABC, only to cut funding to all three areas once elected?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well one of the saddest and most desperate things happening in this campaign is the way the Labor Party is telling people, Australians, and in particular ringing up older Australians in the evening and telling them that Medicare is going to be privatised. It is a complete lie. Medicare is a core Government service. We support it. We spend more on Medicare than ever before. We are as committed to Medicare as any other Australian. Believe me it is a vital part of the Government services. It will never, ever be privatised. It will never, ever be sold. Every element of Medicare's services that is delivered by Government today or undertaken by Government today will be undertaken by Government in the future. That is my pledge, my absolute unequivocal commitment. Every Australian knows that. Mr Shorten knows that. But so desperate is he that he is telling this extraordinary lie to frighten people into, for some reason or other, suspending their rational understanding of what Medicare is and our commitment to it so that he might be able to claw back some votes. It is a shameful thing that he's doing. It is the biggest lie in the whole campaign.

TONY JONES:

Very briefly, have you given up the goal of privatising the Medicare payment system to make them more efficient?

PRIME MINISTER:

There has been consideration of revising the Medicare payment system because it's about 30 years out of date. And there was - I'll just tell you exactly what happened. In 2014 there was a process of looking at alternatives. There is no decision that's been taken. No proposal to undertake any particular revision has been made. But I'm saying to all Australians, unequivocally, as Prime Minister, that no part of Medicare that is delivered by Government today will be delivered in any, by anyone else in the future.

TONY JONES:

That includes the payment system?

PRIME MINISTER:

Absolutely.

TONY JONES:

You've reversed your position on that, or add least the goal of doing it?

PRIME MINISTER:

There was no position to reverse. But the point is this - the payment system has to be updated. It has to get to a sort of smartphone era. I think, as we all know, it is pretty out of date. But we will revive it or renew it. We will modernise it but we will do so within Government. Can I say this about out-sourcing. I don't have an ideological view about out-sourcing Government services but I'm very sceptical about the way in which very large IT services have been out-sourced to big systems integrators in the past. And the efficiencies have often been, you know, less in reality than they were in promise. That's why as Prime Minister - as I set it up as Communications Minister in fact but it's now in my Department - that's why I set up the Digital Transformation Office within Government that is to be an agency to operate like a start-up with the innovative edge of a start-up but to revive and renew Government online services from within Government, rather than just signing big contracts with big private companies, big systems integrators. One, Medicare's payment system will not be out-sourced, full stop. Number two, I'm not an unqualified fan of out-sourcing at all and if I wasn't, if I was an unqualified fan I would never have set up the Digital Transformation Office. So you can see from my deeds, what I'm saying to you is a matter of genuine conviction that what we have to do is ensure that you bring Government into the 21st century. Government services into the 21st century and you don't do that solely by pushing them all out the door so that there is nothing left inside Government. There is a lot of innovation that can be done in Government if you provide the right leadership and the right culture.

[APPLAUSE]

TONY JONES:

Okay I think we’ve got that. Thank you. Zachary is our next questioner, again on health – go ahead.

QUESTION:

I'm a junior doctor working a busy public hospital emergency department. My colleagues and I are at the coalface as we're constantly asked to do more; to see more patients, sicker patients who need more care.

This innovation can lead to some efficiency gains but at the end of the day, sometimes just more funding is required. Mr Turnbull, how would a re-elected Government you lead propose on funding the same levels of healthcare services our communities need, particularly when your Government has continued to book much of your public hospital funding cuts your predecessor Tony Abbott has proposed into your forward budget estimates. Mr Turnbull, something has to give and our concern is that something is going to be our patients.

PRIME MINISTER:

Zachary firstly, can I thank you for the work you do in the public hospital system and thank you for your commitment and I know the hours you doctors work, all doctors work, but particularly young doctors like yourself work, are outrageously long. It's a measure of your commitment and your passion for your patients that you do so and I thank you for them. Let me deal first with funding. There were big cuts to hospital funding or big changes to hospital funding I should say in the 2014 Budget.

TONY JONES:

I think you can call them big cuts? That was a fair description - $57 billion?

PRIME MINISTER:

No, that’s –

TONY JONES:

$57 billion was taken out of future hospital funding.

PRIME MINISTER:

Tony, that is actually not true but if you'd let me answer the question and then I can come back to that mythical figure.

What I have done Zachary is this; I reached agreement at the last COAG meeting with all the states and territories including the State of Queensland and we've added an additional $2.9 billion to hospital funding, Federal Government hospital funding. We've restored a 6.5 per cent growth factor which was agreed with the states. We've ensured that it is activity-based funding based on a national efficient price. That's been a complete change from the position that had been set out by Mr Abbott when he was Prime Minister. So that's a very large change both in dollars and in methodology and that funding is substantially increased, it's growing every year. It's the largest, you know, it's higher than it has been in the past.

Let me deal with the second point, the second part of your question about patients. One of the things we don't do well enough in Australia is ensure that patients are treated, looked after in primary health care. Too many patients find their way into hospitals, into acute care which is obviously distracting you from people with really acute conditions and of course it's extremely expensive. So what we are setting up and trialling now and Sussan Ley, the Health Minister is leading this, is something called Healthcare Homes that we have worked out with the AMA, where we're going to trial a system where a doctor or a doctor's practice will be paid quarterly for managing people with chronic conditions. As you know, a small percentage of patients have a very disproportionate share of health expenditures and health consultations, because they have multiple chronic conditions. So what we're seeking to do there is to better reward doctors in managing a patient's care in a very holistic way and managing all of their different consultants and specialists, and therefore reduce the burden on the hospital system where you work, so that you're less pressured. I'm sure you can take the strain, you look very fit, but you know what I mean. You're less pressured with cases that don't need to be in hospital and you can spend more time on the patients that do. So that's our commitment.

TONY JONES:

Now, I'll just bring up your colleague, New South Wales Premier Mike Baird says the biggest challenge facing his state and the nation, is health funding. It's a critical issue he says, the largest cost to his budget. He says beyond 2020 is where the real problem arises. You have actually given a stop-gap funding effectively until then, what happens after that? Because that's when you're supposed to bring down a surplus but if you have also got to increase hospital funding, how are you going to do it?

PRIME MINISTER:

Tony, this is why it's vital to live within your means. This is why it's vital to have a strong economy. You see, we talk about the need to spend more on health and we do spend more on health and I don't resent that. Some people say we're spending more on health than we ever did and that's somehow or other a measure of bad management. The truth is, thanks to Zachery and other doctors and pharmacists and specialists, we are all getting a better outcome from the health services we enjoy, than we ever did before. We're living longer, we're living healthier and that is partly because of lifestyle changes, but also because of better medicine and better healthcare. So it's a very worthwhile investment but we have got to make sure that we get value for money, both from the patient's point of view and the taxpayers' point of view. We also have got to make sure that we have a strong economy that can pay for it. So when I talk about…

TONY JONES:

Does that mean the $57 billion that you claim is mythical?

PRIME MINISTER:

Okay, well let me address that. While Julia Gillard was prime minister, she promised $57 billion of additional spending on hospitals over a very long period. As Colin Barnett said, who is the last Premier who was present at that COAG meeting – as he said publicly - everybody knew that was completely unreal. The money was not real. The money was not there. It was a flourish in an election year.

You'll notice that Mr Shorten hasn't proposed to put it back. The money was never there. So the $57 billion - if it was real - Labor would be promising to reinstate it. But it was not real. Now what we do have is a strong, substantial affordable increase in healthcare funding which we are committed to and which we can pay for, but we can only pay for it if we have strong economic growth. That is why every element of my national economic plan will deliver stronger economic growth, more employment, more jobs and therefore over time, stronger government revenues to pay for Zachary and his hospital and all the other services that we enjoy from government.

[APPLAUSE]

TONY JONES:

Okay. Now, you're watching Q&A live from Brisbane. Our apologies to the Twitter community we're having a problem getting your tweets on screen at the moment. We hope to have that fixed as soon as possible. Our next question comes from Jodie.

QUESTION:

Prime Minister - how come you can afford to give tax concessions to wealthy and in some cases filthy rich companies whilst citing budget responsibility for forcing people to pay a co-payment for medical services? As a person who continues in the work force with a life-threatening illness, I can't afford to pay a co-payment every time I need a blood test or a scan. Why would people's health be your lowest priority?

TONY JONES:

That's obviously a reference to the Government's decision to cut off Medicare rebates for pathology and for scans.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, the bulk billing will continue Jodie - as you would have seen with the agreement with the pathologists and the radiologists - bulk billing will continue. Bulk billing is at an all-time high. Do you know that in the last year in Queensland, Queensland alone, there were 2.3 million more bulk billed Medicare consultations than in the last year of the Labor government. So despite all of the rhetoric, bulk billing has never been higher.

Now as far as cutting company tax Jodie, the reason for that is very simple. It is because I want to ensure that we have more investment and more jobs. You see a lot of people - particularly I'd say this is the view of many people in the Labor Party - regard the economy as a cake, that is fixed. That all they need to do is say that “well we'll take a bit more of it, a bit more of it for our constituencies”. The reality is the size of the economy, the growth of the economy is very dynamic and it's more dynamic than ever, in these much more competitive times in this global economy. You need to ensure that Government is doing everything it can to make for more investment, more employment and therefore a stronger economy, leads to more tax revenues.

TONY JONES:

We are –

PRIME MINISTER:

Without which you can't afford any of the services we value.

TONY JONES:

We have a specific question on the company tax cuts. I'll just quickly go back to Jodie. What do you think about the answer you've just heard? Are you reassured, is what I am saying?

QUESTION:

No. I'm not.

TONY JONES:

Why not?

QUESTION:

I didn't think the answer was answered how I felt it should be. I thought that you would address it rather than brushing over it. I thought you'd address it more.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well Jodie your concern is that you won't be able to get a bulk billed service, is that right?

QUESTION:

No I'm concerned I'm going to be having to pay co-payments.

PRIME MINISTER:

Yeah I understand but –

QUESTION:

As a person who works, I don't get healthcare cards or any concessions or anything, I pay full price for everything.

PRIME MINISTER:

But my point is if you are bulk billed, there is not a co-payment. If you are bulk billed there's not a co-payment and what I'm saying to you is the arrangement with those pathologists for example that you mentioned, the arrangement is that they'll continue bulk billing. The Minister is examining the way in which the regulation of - it’s a complex issue - the way in which rents are set or rents are regulated for pathologist rooms and the Council of the Pathologists Association have agreed to continue bulk billing. So you will be able to get a bulk billed service from your pathologist going forward.

TONY JONES:

You’re saying without a co-payment?

PRIME MINISTER:

Exactly that's right. When they bulk bill they don't charge you a co-payment.

TONY JONES:

Okay. Next question now from Lydia.

QUESTION:

Good evening, Prime Minister. Both of the major parties have pledged a return to surplus in 2020/21 and say their spending promises can be funded. Given that Treasury forecasts over the past years have fallen short by billions of dollars, it would seem that future projections are unreliable. With this historic reality, it appears a commitment to surplus and generous promises are being made on the never never. Without going far enough with necessary spending cuts, are both sides guilty of ignoring economic facts?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, that's a very good question and you've questioned the forecasts, the validity of forecasts. You're right, in recent times the forecasts have been too optimistic. However, if you go back to the days of the Howard Government, the forecasts were too pessimistic and invariably the surpluses ended up being higher than were expected. So, all that really describes is the fact that forecasting is a perilous business and this is why when people talk about meeting, you know, paying for things in 10 years’ time, you've got to be fairly sceptical about that.

TONY JONES:

We would be sceptical about your promise to come to a surplus then.

[LAUGHTER]

Because that's beyond the period of the Government?

PRIME MINISTER:

No.

TONY JONES:

It's a forecast. Isn't it?

PRIME MINISTER:

Let me go on.

TONY JONES:

Sorry.

PRIME MINISTER:

It is a forecast. The way the Budget operates is the Budget covers what are called the forward estimates which is four years. Obviously the closer you are, the first year, you've got a higher degree of certainty than the second, third or fourth. But four years is a long enough period. Now what we know is that in our Budget, which has gone through Treasury and Finance and been ticked off by the Departments of Treasury and Finance objectively in the Pre-Election Fiscal Outlook, what we know is that we are bringing the deficit down to $6 billion of deficit in the fourth year and coming into balance in the fifth. What Labor is saying is that - and they haven't given us the numbers yet, of course - they say they're going to run much higher deficits in each of those four years but then miraculously, by some Houdini-like manoeuvre...

TONY JONES:

By raising, they would say, I have to jump in her, but they would say by raising tax revenue...

PRIME MINISTER:

Of course you do. You have to defend the Labor Party, Tony.

TONY JONES:

By raising tax revenue. By raising tax revenue that's how they say they're going to do it.

PRIME MINISTER:

I've never heard them explain it quite as well as you. You should do more work for them.

[LAUGHTER]

You're a very good spokesman for the ALP. Anyway, there you go.

TONY JONES:

Let's try and talk a little bit about the facts.

PRIME MINISTER:

Yeah, sure. Can we stop ignoring your audience member?

TONY JONES:

Very happy for you to come back in if you'd like to.

QUESTION:

No, no - you're doing a great job. Thank you.

[LAUGHTER]

TONY JONES:

We talked earlier, Prime Minister, about the upcoming funding shortfall for hospitals that happens around the time you’re supposed to come into to surplus. Then there is the NDIS which when it is fully operational by 2020, is going to cost $22 billion a year. Now even Mathias Cormann says your figures for actually funding that are out by $5 billion. So how are you going to guarantee a surplus with all these big expenditures coming exactly at the time your surplus is supposed to arrive?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well Tony, all of the assumptions are set out in the Budget Papers and there will be - when you get to the end of the four year period or the five year period - you'll find there are many changes. The question is - the only issue really - is are the assumptions on which you've made your forecasts reasonable? And they are. You don't have to take my word for it or Mathias’ word or Scott Morrison's word for it, you have the word of the Secretaries of the Departments of Finance and Treasury because what they do as part of Peter Costello's Charter of Budget Honesty - I might add, one of Peter’s very significant economic reforms - they have to give an objective signoff on the fiscal outlook in the lead-up to an election. So they've done that.

TONY JONES:

Let's go to our next question from Ben.

QUESTION:

Hi, Prime Minister. Earlier this year you proposed the greatest tax reform in a generation but then abandoned it. We have a Budget crisis and need a leader, in your words, who respects voters' intelligence, explains complex issues, sets a course of action and makes a case for it. GST and personal income tax make up over 50 per cent of the tax revenue in Australia. So why are we not talking about it at this election?

PRIME MINISTER:

We are talking about personal income tax and we are increasing the threshold, the $80,000 threshold from $80 to $87,000 which means people on average full-time earnings will not go into the second highest tax bracket for some years. So that's one piece of tax relief we've given to middle Australia.

In terms of the GST, it was very fashionable to say that we should increase the GST. Various premiers suggested that - Jay Weatherill, the Labor Premier of South Australia was very keen on it. Your own –no your Premier here wanted to put up, in Queensland, she wanted to put up income tax and give the money to the states. But there was support for...

TONY JONES:

Actually didn't you want the states to be able to raise their own income tax?

PRIME MINISTER:

Let me just finish the answer.

TONY JONES:

That was part of the question.

PRIME MINISTER:

No let me go on with the answer. We looked at the GST very carefully, because there was an argument, the proposition was made that if you increase the GST you could raise, say by 5 per cent, you'd raise about $30 billion additional revenue a year. We looked at that and the thought was that you could then use that to reduce income tax and other taxes.

By the time you kept people in the bottom 40 per cent of household incomes, you know, compensated, keep them no worse off, you had very little money left. You had at best 15, more likely $12 billion left. So the problem with increasing the GST - and we made all this modelling public - is it just didn't stack up.

A lot of prime ministers in the past, a lot of politicians in the past, have kicked the GST issue into the long grass because they say it's too politically hard. I decided because of that commitment I made to have an honest and open discussion, I decided we should look at it. It was on the table, everyone was talking about it. We did the distributional analysis, it didn’t stack up. It just did not stack up and that is why we are not touching the GST. We will not touch the GST. It does not stack up from an equitable distributional point of view.

TONY JONES:

I'm going to go back to the questioner. Are you happy with the answer that you've received there or were you talking more broadly about tax reform?

QUESTION:

I feel like the GST changes is something that a conversation that we need to have and I don't believe that increasing bracket creep qualifies as the greatest tax reform in generations.

PRIME MINISTER:

I don't think it does either. I've never said it did.

QUESTION:

Well you said you were talking about greatest -

TONY JONES:

The greatest tax reform in Federation, well the greatest reform to Federation was going to be states raising income tax.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well Ben, let me answer that. Let me answer that. The states - we have in Australia this problem, this phenomenon called vertical fiscal imbalance which basically means the federal government raises most of the money that the states spend.

Clearly in an ideal world governments would raise the money they spend. But we were being

pressured by state governments to either raise GST - that was particularly from the South Australians and to a lesser extents from New South Wales - your Premier here in Queensland was urging us to increase income tax and give the money to the states.

So what I said to the states was, "look if you're so keen to raise tax, why don't we let you raise some income tax?"

They all threw up their hands and said, "No way, Jose." So I said, "that's fine. That's good. This is a moment of clarity. You don't want to raise tax, I don't want to raise tax, so guess what? We're going to have to live within our means."

That’s exactly what we're doing.

[APPLAUSE]

TONY JONES:

Remember, this is an election campaign. If you hear any doubtful claims, send a tweet using the hashtags FactCheck and Qanda. We'll publish the verdicts on our Twitter account.

The next question comes from Jacqueline.

QUESTION:

Mr Turnbull, your jobs and growth mantra is based on the trickle-down economics theory. Your former employer Goldman Sachs and many other trusted sources have raised serious concerns about this tax cuts and confirmed that a significant proportion of the windfall will benefit overseas investors, shareholders and not trickle down at all. Over 10 years the plan will cost the Australian taxpayer in the vicinity of $50 billion. Why should ordinary Australians support cuts to our services to give companies a tax cut that according to so many experts probably won't create jobs or contribute to growth significantly and elsewhere has been shown to increase inequality in society?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well Jaqueline thank you. Firstly let me say that cutting company tax does not increase inequality in society. There has been a long trend towards reducing company tax right around the world. The biggest cutter of company tax in our lifetimes is in fact Paul Keating, who cut company tax twice and he cut it because he knew that if you reduced company tax, if you reduced business tax, you increase the return on investment. If you increased the return on investment, you get more investment. If you get more investment, you get more employment and you get more growth. That's why the Treasury found last year that for every dollar cut in company tax, you got $4 of benefit of growth into the economy, into GDP of which between two-thirds and three quarters went to labour, went to workers.

Now Bill Shorten made exactly that point only a few years ago and you've all seen that clip on television I'm sure. Chris Bowen wrote a book about it. Chris Murphy, who was the main consultant on the Henry Tax Review during the Labor government has made the point that the single most valuable thing the Government can do to drive economic growth in terms of tax reform is to reduce company tax. Do you know in 2001, when Peter Costello reduced the company tax from I think then 33% to 30%, there were seven countries in the OECD with a tax rate, a company tax rate, that was lower than Australia at that point. There are now 27.

You see, it's a very competitive world for capital. The more competitive we are the more investment there will be, including from overseas and so you get stronger economic growth. You can't assume in this highly uncertain time, of great opportunity but great challenge.

I mean here in Queensland, you have an economy that is transitioning from one that was fuelled up by a big mining construction boom. Where are the jobs going to come from in the future? Where are the opportunities going to come from in the future? They will come - believe me - from the enterprise and the innovation, the risk-taking and the imagination of Queensland businesses and businesses that operate here and the people that invest in them.

You need a Government that gets behind them because it's that enterprise that will ensure our children and our grandchildren will have the jobs they deserve in the future.

[APPLAUSE]

TONY JONES:

Can I quickly go back to our questioner. You have an answer and do you want a follow-up question?

QUESTION:

Well, there is no requirement on companies to invest in jobs. They could just pocket the windfall. So it seems to me to be an experiment at the expense of services that Australian taxpayers expect. And then on the other hand with these tax cuts you're proposing, a lot of the research that I've looked in to, Goldman Sachs, for example, the IMF, the Councillor of Small Business, John Hewson, the Grattan Institute, have all said up to 30 per cent of the windfall will go to overseas investors. In fact, up until 2026, there's going to be a revenue -

TONY JONES:

I have to bring you to your point.

QUESTION:

…Of $8 billion. Australian taxpayers should not have money going to the IRS.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well Jacqueline let me, let me remind you that if we are re-elected, next financial year beginning July 1, there will be a 2.5 per cent reduction in company tax to 27.5 per cent for companies with a turnover of $10 million or less. The next year it will be $25 million or less. The next year it will be $50 million or less and then there will be another election. Assuming you’ve re-elected me - you can then choose to chuck me out as Prime Minister, if you don't like those three years.

Now those companies, they are small and medium companies. They are overwhelmingly Australian owned and overwhelmingly family owned. If you then chose to return us to Government in 2019, you would go then to $100 million turnover, $250 million turnover, $500 million turnover. Again, there aren't too many multinationals and no certainly no giant companies there. Then there will be another election in 2022.

See the big companies would only get a tax cut under our proposal three elections away and eight years away. So what you're voting on, if you regard your vote as being, as I think it's fair for us all to regard our vote as basically being for the next three years, I'm asking for a 3-year renewal of my Government's job serving you.

TONY JONES:

Except when it comes to the surplus, of course.

PRIME MINISTER:

What it will be is a tax cut that will apply to companies with $10 million, $25 million and $50 million. These are not giants. These are family businesses employing, reinvesting their earnings into their Australian business and their Australian employees.

[APPLAUSE]

TONY JONES:

It's time to move along now. You're watching a special prime ministerial edition of Q&A.

This question is a video from Jeff Diver in Mosman Park, Western Australia.

QUESTION:

Hello Prime Minister. I'm a father who has lost two young adult children to suicide in the past five years and I know I'm not alone. More than 2,800 Australians take their lives every year. It's a pain that we feel daily and we can't imagine the anguish and despair they must have felt in making a decision to take their own life. But still we see a 20% increase in suicide rates in the past decade. It’s the leading cause of death for our young people and in some of our remote communities we have the highest suicide rates in the world. So when is enough, enough? It alarms me and I expect it alarms you.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well Jeff it does. It's hard to imagine how painful and heartbreak it must be for you.

This suicide tragedy - which is what it is - is something that is very close to me in every respect. In my electorate of Wentworth which is in Sydney's east one of the beautiful places there is a place called the Gap, at South Head. Huge cliffs overlooking the ocean, it’s of the most beautiful sights, vistas, views in the city. And it is the single place where more Australians choose to kill themselves than any other.

We governments, have spent a lot of money and time over the years to make changes to the landscape and fencing to discourage people killing themselves. But it is a haunting reminder of the tragedy of suicide. Now, we are committed passionately to addressing this challenge of mental illness, which suicide is the end, it is the final disaster of mental illness.

As you know, Headspace was established by the Howard Government, we have early psychosis centres, we are increasing funding to primary health networks so that we get more suicide prevention and mental health treatment services delivered across Australia, particularly in regional Australia. This is not even remotely a partisan issue, I hope. Everybody is committed to this. Over the last few days, as I do often, I have been speaking to the two people in the psychiatric profession, I find most informed on this Patrick McGorry and Ian Hickey. Early prevention is absolutely critical, but above all is awareness.

TONY JONES:

You have just mentioned that, I don’t mean to interrupt.

PRIME MINISTER:

Yeah.

TONY JONES:

It’s from Jacqueline Whybrow Manager of the Early Psychosis Centre at Logan Headspace – what is the Government's commitment to the funding of new and existing Headspace centres beyond the next two years and why is the Government stopping funding for youth early psychosis programs?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, the answer is we're not. The answer is we are not.

TONY JONES:

Do you know why the manager of a Headspace centre would think that you are?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, that is a good question. But I've discussed this issue literally in the last few days directly with Patrick McGorry and the Minister and Patrick has been giving interviews about this himself since then. Dealing firstly, there are six youth early psychosis centres and one of them is in Logan. Their funding is committed and secure.

Their performance will be reviewed and Patrick and I have agreed on this, in 2019. That will be - we'll see how they've gone, but so far they're going well. As far as Headspace is concerned, the funding - there are about 100 Headspace centres -the funding for them will be delivered, they'll be

directly accountable after two years to the Primary Health Networks. Their funding is secure and committed into the future. If a Primary Health Network wants to stop supporting a Headspace in its area - presumably because they feel it's not doing the job - they will have to give the Headspace Central the opportunity to rectify any problems and if they still say, "this particular Headspace is just not up to scratch, we think we can do the job better with someone else," then they'll have to satisfy the Federal Minister for Health that the needs of those patients are going to be adequately met elsewhere. Now this is something that I've worked through with Sussan Ley and Patrick McGorry very carefully. So your correspondent there can be reassured of absolutely rock-solid commitment.

[APPLAUSE]

TONY JONES:

Thank you for that. We have just received an SMS from the gentleman who sent the earlier video question. He says “we need firm action, more than soft words, future reform needs to be more bottom up and inclusive. Do you have structure in place for this?”

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, the answer is we just talked about them, the early psychosis centres and Headspace. But I have to say that there is a place for, if not soft words, at least kind words. I think all of you, many of you, all of us are familiar with the R U OK movement. Taking an interest in the mental health of your family, your friends, your work mates is important. A simple reaching out to say you know, "are you OK? You seem a bit troubled." You know de-stigmatising, removing the taboo on discussing mental illness and being alert to it, is very, very important. A lot of people can go all too quickly from being down, to being depressed, to being self-destructive. That warm hand of outreach is more than a soft word, it can be a saving word, it can be a saving outreach.

[APPLAUSE]

TONY JONES:

The next question, thank you very much. The next question is a video from Manus Island, Papua New Guinea.

QUESTION:

I'm talking to you from Manus Prison. Australia sent me here by force three years ago. What is my crime? I am a refugee, fled injustice, discrimination and persecution, I didn’t leave my family by choice. Why am I still in this horrible prison after three years?

[APPLAUSE]

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, Tony, as you know - and I'm not sure, I suspect your correspondent from Manus Island you can't see this - but I don't know anything about his personal circumstances.

TONY JONES:

I can tell you just a few things. We have got the question and we tried to find out who he is. He's an Iranian-Kurdish journalist who fled his country to avoid imprisonment for his writing. He’s had a preliminary assessment from the PNG Immigration Department saying he does meet the criteria to be recognised as a refugee. But as he says he's been detained for three years on Manus. Can you offer him any hope that he will be released from there?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well again, look I'd rather not comment on this particular case but let me hypothesise a little bit. A person who has been found to be given refugee status in PNG, is able to then seek, enabled them to settle in PNG. I know, I'm sure that he would rather come to Australia, but that option is not available to him. We have learned the tragic truth that when the very strict and clear border protection policies of the Howard Government were - despite our urgings not to do so - undone by Kevin Rudd, we had 50,000 unlawful arrivals. We had 1200 deaths at sea of which we know. It was a catastrophe.

Now we have been able to restore the security on the border. The people smugglers are out of business. They would love to get back into business. They are itching to get back into business, believe me and every now and then they test us out. But we have kept our policy firm. We have had no unlawful arrivals, no unauthorised arrivals, no people smuggling expedition successful for well over 660 days. It is a very long time and it's a great credit to the Ministers, to Scott Morrison and Peter Dutton, that they've been able to enforce that.

It is a tough policy I grant you that. It is a harsh policy. But in Government and in politics, often you are presented with tough choices and the alternative is not a theoretical one. It's what Kevin Rudd delivered, regrettably; 50,000 unauthorised arrivals,1200 deaths at sea of which we know, doubtless there were more.

TONY JONES:

The next question is a follow-up now effectively it’s from Greg.

QUESTION:

Mr Turnbull, recently a contractor who worked on Manus Island was returning to his work there and in very low tones, he said to the editor of the Australian Adventist Record: "It is terrible the way they treat the people there. They are treated worse than animals."

Will you visit this concentration camp and see it for yourself?

[APPLAUSE]

PRIME MINISTER:

Well thank you for that invitation. The Manus Island facility is managed by, as you know, by the Government of Papua New Guinea. We are satisfied that the conditions there are not as described by the contractor you referred to. Look, I recognise all of us, every one, none of us have hearts of stone. All of us understand how harsh it is, our policy is, in terms of it’s impact on particular individuals. Of course, the gentleman we referred to there, he has other options as well, doesn't just have to come to Australia.

But the thing we know, is that the alternative if we abandon our strong defence of our border … there's no point being mealy-mouth about this. The Labor Party did this in government. They ran Kevin, remember Kevin? Kevin 07, Kevin from Brisbane, “I'm here to help”. He said he was going to turn back the boats and he was going to maintain a tough line on border protection. He did neither, that's what we got. So we know what the Labor Party's track record is.

Now believe me, the alternative to the approach we have at the moment is not a theoretical one. You get a lot of discussions, we were talking a moment ago about company tax, how do you know it will do this, how do you know it will do that? Somebody says this, somebody says that. This is not theory. We know what happens when a Labor government is in charge of border protection. They drop the ball, they don't have the conviction to keep the borders secure and you have unauthorised arrivals. You have thousands and thousands of people in detention.

There were 2,000 children in detention in Australia at the end of the Labor Government. Do you know how many there are now? None. That's because of the fact that we have a strong policy. We have closed 14 of 17 detention centres in Australia. We have been able to do that because we have stopped the boats. Now, I grant you it is tough, it is tough. But the alternative is far worse and that is what I, as PM, that's the tough choice that you entrust me to make as this nation's leader.

TONY JONES:

The questioner stood up again. A brief one? Because we’ve got to move on to other topics.

QUESTION:

I'm thinking of the homophobia response that you made only last Thursday night, where you said that we are, our democracy is based on respect. The better we are at doing that and showing love, is the best way for us to go. Why can't you change and take that concept and put it on to Manus Island?

[APPLAUSE]

TONY JONES:

Can you do this briefly?

PRIME MINISTER:

Thank you and that's a very fair question. This is the problem; if we were to say to all of the people on Manus, "OK, come and settle in Australia," that would be the biggest marketing opportunity for the people smugglers you have ever seen. The boats would be setting off again. It would be starting up. They would say, "look, get into the boats. Give us $5,000 and don't worry, the Australians will let you in." It would all start again. I promise you, the people smugglers are in the marketing business. They use all the social media that we use, Facebook, Twitter, all of that stuff and they're very good at it.

Any weakness on our part will be exploited by them and the consequence will be women and children and families drowning at sea. So it's a tough choice but that's my job to make tough choices to defend Australia, to defend the integrity of our borders.

[APPLAUSE]

TONY JONES:

The next question is a very different topic. A lot of topics to get through and Prime Minister we might try and keep the answers a little brief so we can get through more of them. The next question is Daniel.

QUESTION:

Prime Minister the NBN your Government has implemented, while being cheaper, is proven to be outdated and much slower than the Labor Government's NBN scheme. Countries like the UK, New Zealand and Germany are already replacing these parts of their networks with fibre to the premises instead. How will you ensure the NBN will be future proofed so taxpayers do not end up paying twice to rebuild the NBN infrastructure, much like the UK is now?

[APPLAUSE]

PRIME MINISTER:

Thank you, Daniel. The facts that you've laid out there, regrettably are not so. Let me give you some facts. When we inherited the NBN from the Labor Party, the project had completely failed. It had ground to a halt in many parts of Australia. They had succeeded in connecting to the NBN a little over 50,000 premises. We connected more than 60,000 last month. The project was was a complete failure. Now normally bad projects get worse and I think everyone involved here in the contracting business or project business would understand that. We have turned it around.

There are now 2.6 million premises in Australia where you can get the NBN. There are well over a million premises that have got it. Can I say to you that you have talked about the need to have higher speeds and so forth. Of the 1,050,000 –roughly- customers on the NBN, about 13% are ordering the 100 megabyte per second product. About 84% are ordering 25 megs or less. For example, with fixed wireless, which is a terrific service I might say, which applies in regional

Australia, there are three products; 12, 25, 50 megs. These are serving communities that had no broadband at all so this is really transformative stuff. 2% are ordering the 50 meg product.

So the reality is that the service is meeting the demand of the customers. We're rolling it out, we're rolling it out literally six to eight years sooner and $30 billion cheaper than would have been the case under Labor's plan. Now there's a quarter of Australian households and businesses, premises that can get it now. In two years it will be three quarters and by 2019/20, it will be finished. That’s what we have done, we have taken this failed project and we're delivering it and we're delivering it quickly and at lower cost.

TONY JONES:

Do you want a quick response to that?

QUESTION:

I guess in a way it could be said that under your Government there has been a bit of wastage as well, like whether the Optus HFC network was bought out by the NBN. Most of that has had to be redone because it's not been up to scratch.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well again, what the Labor Party did was they did a deal with Optus and Telstra to pay them a price for each premises as they were overbuilt by the NBN. OK? What I succeeded in negotiating - I was the Communications Minister obviously so it was my job- what I succeeded in negotiating with Telstra and Optus was that we'd get access to their old networks, their existing legacy networks, whether it was copper or HFC. So we're not paying any more for that, we’re actually not paying any more to Optus for that. But it means that we can use those networks, those assets, those legacy assets, to roll the service out quickly. You see at the end of the day it doesn't matter whether you're getting your high-speed service on COAX on fibre, on VDSL, on wireless, whatever, as long as you're getting the service that you need. That's obvious. What we're doing is getting all Australians hooked up to broadband much, much faster and much, much cheaper and the runs are on the board.

TONY JONES:

Much, much faster is what we need to do with the answers. I'm sorry about that. Next question now from Nick.

QUESTION:

Prime Minister Turnbull, Sheikh Shady Alsuleiman has made comments calling homosexuality an evil act which brought evil outcomes. How are these anymore abhorrent than the comments by Senator Cory Bernardi suggesting that homosexuality leads to bestiality or George Christensen saying Safe Schools leads to paedophile grooming?

[APPLAUSE]

PRIME MINISTER:

Well the Sheik’s comments went beyond the remarks that you made there, but I won’t repeat them. I reject and condemn any comments which disparage any group of Australians, whether on their race, their religion, their sexuality, their gender. You know we have a very diverse and very successful and relatively harmonious multicultural society. We are a very diverse nation. I think it is one of our greatest strengths, if not our greatest strength.

But the foundation of that is mutual respect, with which one of our guests here spoke a moment ago. That mutual respect is absolutely critical. So I condemn remarks which disparage Australians, whoever makes them, on the basis of their sexuality, or on the basis of their religion or their gender or their ethnic background. It is the key to our success is mutual respect. That is the foundation of our success as the great, diverse, multicultural nation that we are, the most successful multicultural nation in the world.

TONY JONES:

One word answer, did you say that to Cory Bernardi?

PRIME MINISTER:

I have said - yes, I have had firm discussions with a number of colleagues. Yes.

TONY JONES:

We have a follow-up question from Margaret.

QUESTION:

Good evening, Prime Minister. I find it an insult to actually be asked to vote for my gay son and nephew to be equal with their siblings. They are equal. You the Government, need to amend your Marriage Act accordingly to allow same-sex marriage without my vote. The $160 million plebiscite money is better spent treating depression, alcoholism, drugs and suicide prevention. Why are you not amending the law within the Marriage Act? It is a parliamentary process. We elect representatives into parliament, so just show me some leadership and by doing your job.

[APPLAUSE]

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, you've made, you make a powerful point very eloquently.

QUESTION:

I don't want to vote so my son has permission to marry.

PRIME MINISTER:

No from a legal and constitutional point of view, you're absolutely right. Parliament could amend the Marriage Act without the support, without the consultation of a plebiscite. But as I explained earlier, that was a commitment that was made by the Government when Tony was Prime Minister. It was a commitment that was reached, an agreement that was reached in the Coalition party room.

QUESTION:

But you're the Prime Minister.

PRIME MINISTER:

Yes I am the Prime Minister but I'm not the dictator. Some people like the idea of prime ministers that ignore their colleagues, I don't agree with that. I'm a strong believer in traditional cabinet government and that means compromise. That means listening to your colleagues. That means being the first among equals and respecting the views of those in your cabinet and in your party room that you may not agree with.

Now we made that commitment to a plebiscite. I can assure you that it is, it has very strong support popularly. I know you believe it's not necessary. About two-thirds of Australians approve of the idea of having the plebiscite.

QUESTION:

They didn't ask me.

PRIME MINISTER:

I'm sure they didn't. But the point is that we will have that plebiscite. It will be a respectful, intelligent debate, just as the Irish did, as you know the Irish held a plebiscite, a referendum.

TONY JONES:

Can we ask Margaret here, are you worried that it won't be respectful?

QUESTION:

Well, it's not that, it's all the other people who are going to come out of the woodwork and create a lot of pain and disharmony in the lead-up to your plebiscite. It's all very well to say homophobia doesn't exist, It sure does. I just don't think that the LBGTI community needs to cope with that. It's going to affect more and more people.

TONY JONES:

Very brief response here.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, I know Mr Shorten has made some alarming remarks about the prospect of a plebiscite. I have great faith in the decency and the fundamental common sense of Australians. I believe it will be a very civilised discussion. I think if there are people that make outrageous or extreme comments they will only undo their own cause. So I have great - time will tell - but I have great faith in the decency and the common sense of my fellow Australians.

TONY JONES:

We're going to move on now. Another question now. A very different one from Ashley.

QUESTION:

Mr Prime Minister, 27 babies aged five months gestation or more, survived late-term abortions in Queensland hospitals last year. This is the highest number of survivals following attempted terminations in 10 years. But each of these 27 babies were not rendered care and allowed to die. As a medical student who has seen many deliveries and loving care of premature babies, nothing is quite so horrifying as letting a baby perish in a clinic. Is it not the Federal Government's onus to protect all citizens, especially those who cannot speak for themselves?

[APPLAUSE]

PRIME MINISTER:

Ashley can you explain the circumstances you're talking about a little further? Of course, if you were talking about the law that protects any citizen, any person regardless of their age from physical harm, that is the responsibility of Government. I mean, the criminal law in Queensland is enacted by the Queensland Parliament.

TONY JONES:

Talking about late term abortions here.

QUESTION:

So all of these babies were more than five months old already, once they were born there was no protection rendered for them. They were left to perish. So what will your Government do for situations such as these?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, this is an area that is very much - the answer Ashley - is that this is very much an area within the jurisdiction of the State Government, I'm not passing the buck there but that's the fact. I'm not familiar with the precise terms of the law on Queensland relating to abortion, late term or otherwise. But it's very much a matter within the jurisdiction of the Queensland Parliament.

TONY JONES:

You've rarely been asked about your Roman Catholic beliefs but does any of this conflicts with your religious beliefs?

PRIME MINISTER:

What Ashley describes are shocking cases. But you've asked me as the Prime Minister and the leader of the Federal Government, what we can do about that? Again I don't know enough about the circumstances, but the law that relates to abortion is very much within the jurisdiction of your parliament here in Queensland.

TONY JONES:

We have to move on. We have quite a few questions still to go, we have one from Katie.

QUESTION:

G'day, Mr Prime Minister. I'd like to start with a statement and then two questions. I truly believe the Arts have the power to unify and heal our nation like nothing else can. I've got two questions. Do you believe that? My second question is, the arts are at the heart of creative industries and in Australia the music industry alone employs 65,000 people. In the last three years the Coalition has cut an estimated $300 million from artists and arts organisations. With your Government stating that creativity is key to innovation and that jobs and growth are critical to the future of this country, will you as our leader, commit to funding a strong, completely independent Australia Council for the Arts?

[APPLAUSE]

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, the Australia Council is getting more funding now than it did under the Labor Government –

QUESTION:

I asked you about an independent Australia Council for the Arts. Not Brandis's Australia Council for the Arts.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well George Brandis - who I thought you'd all be fans of because he's a Senator from Queensland - George Brandis is no longer the Minister for the Arts, so that's one thing to remember -

QUESTION:

Do you understand the difference between Catalyst and independent Australia Council of the Arts?

PRIME MINISTER:

I do but I was about to explain that because I don't think anyone else might have been so aware of it. When George was the Arts Minister he arranged for a portion of the funding that had

gone to the Australia Council to be dedicated to what was called a Catalyst fund, to be distributed more broadly to other arts companies -

QUESTION:

Therefore making it not independent.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well okay if you let me finish Katie, I'll just complete the answer. Under the Minister for the Arts, who is now another senator, but from Victoria Mitch Fifield, Catalyst - the Minister has not intervened or changed any of the recommendations from the panel that advises his Department as to the disposition of the money through the Catalyst program. It has almost entirely gone to regional companies, to smaller regional companies in Australia who had been seen to be missing out from funding from the Australia Council. So there was a theatre company run for and by disabled people in Geelong - “Back To Back” I think is the name of it, that's one that springs to mind - it's not been, under Mitch's leadership, it has not been politically directed it has not been ministerially directed. But it has seen funding go to a wider range of recipients, particularly in regional Australia.

TONY JONES:

Again, very brief answer. Would you consider shifting that funding back where it was originally in the Australia Council?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well Tony the issue hasn't arisen. I mean you've raised it here, I understand the Australia Council wants, or would prefer to have more discretionary spending in it’s own hands, but I think it's something I inherited from my predecessors' administration and Mitch inherited from George.

But all I can say to you is that the money that's been spent through the Catalyst program has gone to regional arts companies.

TONY JONES:

We have time for one last question. We'll have to answer it briefly we’re nearly out of time, its from Denise.

QUESTION:

Good evening Prime Minister. When you took office, I think there was a great sense of optimism in the community. If you reflect back now on your past 10 months in your job, are you satisfied with your leadership and achievements of you and your Government? And if you got a do-over, what would you do differently?

PRIME MINISTER:

That, that's a good question to which I probably don't have a short enough answer to satisfy Tony Jones.

[LAUGHTER]

TONY JONES:

There are that many things you'd want to do over?

PRIME MINISTER:

[LAUGHTER]

I promised, or I undertook to provide clear economic leadership and I believe I have done that. Look, the circumstances in which we find ourselves - very simply- are we are a high-wage, generous social first world economy in a much more open, much more competitive global environment. We have gigantic changes at a pace and scale never seen before in human history, happening all around us, including extraordinary technological disruption. I mean the smartphones on which we all live, only came out in 2007, think about it. 40 years ago China wasn't part of the global economy, now it's either the biggest or the second biggest economy.

So clearly - and I've been saying, Lucy heard me give this speech the other day and said “you've been giving the speech for years, but people take more notice of you now that you're Prime Minister” - and it's true.

We need to have a clear plan to seize those opportunities and of course deal with those challenges and I have laid that out. It is very clear; it is based on innovation, it's based on investment, it's based on backing enterprise, it's based on tax reform. It's right across the board, I've laid that out. It's a very, very clear plan and clear vision to ensure that we will have the strong economy which will give our children and grandchildren the most opportunities they deserve in this, the most exciting century of all, the 21st century.

TONY JONES:

Well that’s really all we have time for, please thank you our special guest, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

PRIME MINISTER:

Thank you.