PRIME MINISTER:

...They will make a vital momentous decision. They have to choose between stable Coalition majority Government, which I lead - delivering the strong, clear, national economic plan that is delivering stronger growth today, more jobs and will do so over the next three years if they choose to return my Government. On the other hand we have the Labor Party, promising higher debt, higher deficits, higher taxes. And if that wasn’t bad enough, the prospect of a hung parliament and some sort of chaotic alliance with the Greens and independents.

So it is very clear the choice that we're presented with. We say to the Australian people, we ask them to support the Coalition, to stick with us and our economic plan. If we stick together and if we stick with this plan, then we will continue to deliver the strong economic growth we need, the strong economy that enables us to realise our dreams, to get that job, to start that business, to deliver the revenues that pay for all of our essential government services - for health, for education, for Medicare, for infrastructure. Underpinning everything we need to achieve, underpinning all of our aspirations, is a strong economy. And we have a plan for that.

We have looked at the world as it is. We have recognised that we do live in the most exciting times in human history. We have recognised that we live in a world of great opportunity, especially here in this region. A time of great opportunity for Australians, but also a time of risk and uncertainty and head winds - unexpected head winds perhaps, like Brexit. We've seen that. So we need to be resilient. We need to have the plan, we need to have the plan that meets the nature of our times, a time of opportunity and of challenge. To be able to seize those opportunities and meet those challenges, to build a future brighter than ever before, to ensure that our children and our grandchildren have a secure economy in which to realise their dreams. A budget that is coming back into balance, so we do not throw a mountain of debt on their shoulders. All of that, we have taken into account. We set out that national economic plan, bringing it all together in the budget and we have campaigned on that throughout this eight-week campaign.

We put that now before the Australian people for their judgement. We ask for their support, we ask them to choose stability, leadership, a strong Coalition majority Government and the national economic plan that is delivering strong growth and jobs today and will do more so in the years ahead.

JOURNALIST:

Prime Minister, you guaranteed this morning that voters wouldn’t have to pay more to see the doctor despite your freeze on the GP rebate, how possibly can you guarantee that?

PRIME MINISTER:

What I said was this – let's be very very clear about this. Doctors can charge what they like - there is no cap on what doctors can charge. Doctors get a Medicare rebate of $37.05. And they get a bulk billing incentive in the cities of $6 and outside of the cities of $9. The $37.05 rebate has not been increased by indexation since Labor stopped indexation in 2013 and we have continued that freeze on indexation - the Budget sets out that we will continue that over the next four years. The reason we're doing that, quite plainly, is to have resources that we can deploy to fund other investments in health, such as our mental health policy, nearly $200 million, vital elements there - more Headspaces, suicide prevention trial centres. Also to fund very expensive but life-saving drugs like Herceptin like Keytruda and put them on the PBS.

Now, we've heard the Labor Party and others suggest that if indexation is not restored, doctors would increase their fees and put an additional fee on of $15/$20. My point is simply this: If indexation were restored today, doctors would receive less than 60 cents additional. So if a doctor chooses to charge his or her patients $15 more or $10 more or $20 more, that's not because indexation has not resumed, it's because they want to charge $15 or $20 more. The freeze on indexation means that doctors, as of today 1 July, do not get an extra 60 cents – in fact a little less than 60 cents. Over the four years it would be around $2. So the argument that these large increases in doctors' charges are a consequence of indexation not being continued is simply not correct and that's the point - doctors can charge more, some of them do. The fact is, as we know, bulk billing is at an all-time high - fact. That is a fact. It's at an all-time high, despite the fact that the rebate has remained the same since 2013.

JOURNALIST:

So you can't guarantee that patients won't pay an extra 60 cents or up to $2 to see the GP?

PRIME MINISTER:

What I’m saying to you is - let's be absolutely clear about this. The point I am making is that the freeze in the indexation, which is not a justification, or not a cause, to charge the sort of increases that you're talking about or some doctors have been talking about, of $15 or $20 or $10 or $15. That is simply not the case. We're talking about 60 cents. Doctors are free to charge whatever they like, obviously, but they operate in a competitive environment. And plainly, that is why bulk billing is at all-time highs. So those are the facts of the matter. If a doctor wishes to charge more, he or she may attribute that higher charge to whatever they like, but they cannot credibly attribute it to not getting an extra 60 cents this year.

JOURNALIST:

You’ve talked about what a Coalition victory would mean to 24 million Australians. What about you personally, how badly do you want this?

PRIME MINISTER:

Can I say to you, this is a very - I'm very honoured, I'm very privileged to be the Prime Minister of Australia. I love this job. But you know the election is not about me. The election is about 24 million Australians. It's about their future. I know a lot of the commentary focuses on personalities and people and politics - if you like - the struggle of politics. Politics treated almost as a sport by some commentators.

You know, I've spent eight weeks, as many of you have, travelling around Australia. Wherever I speak with Australians and more importantly wherever I listen, their concerns are about their future, about the future economic security of Australia. They want to know that their children and their grandchildren will be able to get great jobs. They want to know that their son or their daughter who is thinking of starting a business, is going to be able to do so and will succeed. So building that strong economy, that strong new economy of the 21st century, that's my job. That's my commitment. This election is about Australians and it will be Australians who make the decision tomorrow to choose their government.

JOURNALIST:

Prime Minister on your economic plan, you said yesterday that from day one you would work on the tax cut, the income tax cut for Australian workers. It turns out there is an administrative reason that means that that cannot start from day one. So how are you going to get around that problem of implementing that tax cut as swiftly as possible because it's meant to apply from today, July 1?

PRIME MINISTER:

It will apply from today, David. It will be legislated and then any - and from the moment of legislation, tax will be collected at the appropriate rate. So the tax cut will be formally and officially delivered and any tax over and above the new rate that has been paid from 1 July until that point will be accounted for at the end of the year. So every Australian will get the benefit of the tax cut either during or at the end of this current financial year, begun today.

JOURNALIST:

So you are you asking them to be patient and wait for it?

PRIME MINISTER:

We're delivering it as quickly as we can and I can assure you this is not a novel state of affairs. This is something the Taxation Department is very familiar with. Every Australian will benefit from that tax cut in the course of this year if we are returned to government and legislate those tax cuts as we have committed to.

JOURNALIST:

On Brexit PM, you’ve talked about having conversations with John Key on a coordinated approach. Would that include perhaps a joint FTA with New Zealand with the United Kingdom effectively treating it like a Trans-Tasman common market with the UK?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, I haven't discussed it to that length with John. These are obviously - with John Key I mean - these are obviously very big - this is a big change. The British vote to leave the European Union, while it was always a possibility - I know most people thought the vote would go the other way, but my perception - my view is that the full consequences of this have not been yet fully taken into account. This is a very, very big deal. There's no question about that.

[Interruption]

Excuse me, let me finish. So we are in negotiations. We have started the process to begin negotiations for a European FTA. New Zealand is in a similar position. They're seeking the same outcome. We certainly - look we cooperate, collaborate with the New Zealanders, we compete with them - not just on the sporting field of course, but there is a lot of - we have a lot of common interests. So John Key and I, if I'm re-elected, as Prime Minister, will be meeting very shortly and looking at all of those issues and we will consider all of those matters when we get together.

JOURNALIST:

Prime Minister, will there be tax reform on the table in the second-term Turnbull Government?

PRIME MINISTER:

All of our tax reform is set out in our economic plan. It is set out in our plan. We're taking it to the Australian public. If they return my Government they will have given us a mandate to carry out our national economic plan and the tax reform - the substantial tax reform - that is contained in it.

JOURNALIST:

Bill Shorten has been on a bit of a campaigning blitz today, he’s visiting a few marginal Sydney seats. You've just had a relatively quiet day in the seat of Reid. Are you confident that you’ve got this in the bag and you've already got your message across?

PRIME MINISTER:

Again, this is a very close election, you're clearly not paying attention to the polls. It is close. It really is close. I mean, you know that, I think we all do. This is a very close election. No-one can take it for granted. Every vote counts. Every single vote counts. That's why I'm saying to all Australians, to all Australians, through the media - through the media I've done this morning and through other interviews I will do later today, I'm saying to every Australian - this is a close election. This is not a time to make a protest vote.

The election is very close. So this is a time to treat your vote for the House and for the Senate as though that is the vote, the single vote, that will determine the government. That is the vote that will determine whether I'm the Prime Minister after Saturday, or Bill Shorten, leading a chaotic alliance of Greens and independents, is running the Country. That's how significant this choice is. So every Australian will recognise the momentous nature of this choice. I'm asking every Australian to vote for stable Coalition majority Government, to vote for the national economic plan.

We alone present the Australian people with a plan, an economic plan that takes into account the opportunities and the challenges of our time and enables us to seize those opportunities, just as we have done by opening up those big Asian markets, or those big export trade deals. Just as we have done by promoting innovation, just as we've done by investing in the Australian Defence Industry, promoting advanced manufacturing. Just as we are doing with supporting small and medium businesses by giving them business tax cuts. Whereas our opponents are increasing taxes. Think about it. What Labor proposes is higher debt, higher deficits and higher taxes. And that at a time of increased uncertainty in the global economy, when you want to make Australia a more attractive place to invest, where you want to inspire business confidence. Labor wages the most anti-business campaign of a generation. I urge Australians to vote for their economic security, vote for the prosperity of their children and grandchildren, vote for a future that enables Australians to realise their dream, because we have the plan that suits the nature of our times.

JOURNALIST:

Nearly 30 per cent of voters are set to choose an independent or minor party. We have already heard many times your view on what that could lead to. The question is why do you think that fewer people are engaging with the major parties in this election particularly?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well all will be revealed tomorrow night. All will be revealed tomorrow night. The Australian people, everyone has had a view. Everyone has had a view about what the Australian people think. Tomorrow they will tell us. And they will tell us emphatically and decisively and I thank you all for accompanying me on this eight-week campaign and we look forward to the judgement of the Australian people tomorrow. Thank you.