PRIME MINISTER:

The confidence in Tasmania is a tribute to the leadership of Will Hodgman, the Premier and the way our economic plan is working already. Particularly those big trade export deals.

As Will described it Tasmanians know very well what the consequences of a minority government are. Indeed Australians know that from the Julia Gillard government.

It's a very clear choice. A stable government - a majority Coalition Government which I lead with a clear national economic plan already delivering economic growth and more jobs across Australia and here in Tasmania - or the chaos of a Labor-Greens-independent alliance.

So the only way to ensure continued economic growth, continued stable Government is to vote for your local Liberal or National candidate.

That is the only way to ensure that your vote delivers the stability and the growth that we need, to seize those opportunities and also be resilient in the face of the challenges we know are out there in the global economy.

JOURNALIST:

Prime Minister Labor thinks this race is tightening particularly in the New South Wales marginals. Do you think it's tightening and what will your message be? What will your theme be at your campaign launch to voters?

PRIME MINISTER:

As I have just described it is a very clear choice. Australians are faced with a very, very clear choice between a stable Coalition Government, majority government with a clear economic plan that will continue to deliver stronger economic growth and more jobs.

On the other hand, a Labor Party in alliance with the Greens and independents - no economic vision for the country, no economic plan, just lies and scares. That's all they're left with. The desperation, the lying desperation of Labor as they edge closer and closer to the Greens and the Independents.

Stability or chaos - that's the clear choice for Australians on July the 2nd.

JOURNALIST:

On Anne Aly, one of the criticisms of the Justice Minister on her is that she's expressed concerns about the plan to strip citizenship from terror suspects. You too raised concerns about that.

Are you very comfortable with the fact it looks like the Liberal Party is orchestrating an Islamic-phobic smear campaign against her?

PRIME MINISTER:

I reject the last part of your question absolutely.

The only point – and look I respect Anne Aly, absolutely, she's an authority in her field. The only point that the Minister has made is that she does not agree with substantial elements of the Government's counterterrorism national security policies and indeed legislation. The leader of her now party - she was of course previously a candidate for the Greens but she's now a member of the Labor Party - the leader of her party Mr Shorten, says he agrees entirely with our legislation and our policies. It is clear that she does not, so the point that the Minister makes is simply she's entitled to her opinion, of course but her opinion is at odds with the leader of her own party.

JOURNALIST:

On the same-sex marriage plebiscite, if the result is yes, will your Cabinet colleagues be bound to vote yes as well or can they vote however they want?

PRIME MINISTER:

I have no doubt that if the plebiscite is carried, as I believe it will be that you will see an overwhelming majority of MPs and senators voting for it.

JOURNALIST:

But is Cabinet bound or is it up to them?

PRIME MINISTER:

The tradition in the Liberal Party is that on matters of this kind it is a free vote but I would expect - you take Scott Morrison, for example.

JOURNALIST:

Or Barnaby Joyce?

PRIME MINISTER:

Scott has indicated that he would abide by the decision of the Australian people. So of course - so I think we have a very - it's a pretty straight forward situation, where you have a question of great interest to many Australians - to most Australians - which will be decided by a plebiscite where every Australian will get a vote. Every Australian will have the same vote as me or Will or any other Member of Parliament and that will determine the outcome of the matter.

JOURNALIST:

What’s your relationship like with Boris Johnson? Do you believe he could be a leader of Great Britain at any stage in the future?

PRIME MINISTER:

I don't know Boris well. I have met him and he is as you see him - a very brilliant, eloquent, erudite leader - a great Mayor of London and of course he is now a Member of Parliament. He's a leading figure in the United Kingdom but I don't want to make any comments on what may or may not happen in the UK. We still don't know what the outcome of the Brexit referendum is so we will just have to await the decision of the British people.

But - it is a reminder that there are always going to be challenges and headwinds in the global economy and that is why you need to have strong and stable government here in Australia. You need to have a clear economic plan in order to ensure that our economy is resilient in the face of those challenges and the only way to deliver that, is by voting for your local Liberal or National candidate at this election.

JOURNALIST:

Just on UTAS, Labor says the relocation is reliant on deregulation, is that correct?

PRIME MINISTER:

That is absolutely untrue. That is another Labor lie. In fact I was asked about that on the radio this morning. There is no conditionality on this $150 million grant which related to any changes to the regulation of universities or university fees.

JOURNALIST:

What do you make of Paul Keating saying your corporate tax cuts are “irresponsible”, particularly given the Coalition previously and for months has been taunting Labor saying that Paul Keating would back that idea?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, Paul Keating is a life-long member of the Labor Party and I'm not surprised by his letter to the Financial Review today, although it has taken him a while to write it. I would say this with Paul Keating, knowing and respecting him well, I would look at what he did in office as a measure of his commitment and convictions rather than what he writes in a letter to a newspaper a week out from an election.

JOURNALIST:

Prime Minister, in terms of Paul Keating he paid for that by increasing other taxes to make up for the shortfall. You haven't said how you're going to pay for your tax cut plan yet. Given your argument there about Paul Keating and what he did, how will you pay for it?

PRIME MINISTER:

Paul Keating when he cut company tax justified it on the basis it was going to drive economic growth and jobs. That's how he justified it at the time and I think that’s the best test of how he justified it. It will not have escaped your notice that we have made very substantial savings in respect of superannuation, so we have made savings in tax and that contributes to the cost of the - the notional cost anyway - of the company tax cuts.

This issue about the impact of cutting company tax is one where Labor today is completely at odds with what its leaders have been saying for decades. The Labor Party cut company tax. They cut company tax when Paul Keating was Treasurer. They sought to cut company tax when they were last in government. Bill Shorten as recently as a few years ago made precisely the same arguments for cutting company tax as Scott Morrison and I are making today.

So it's perfectly straight forward where we stand on this. If you lower company tax you improve the return on investment, if you improve the return on investment you get more investment, if you get more investment you get more employment. That's why as the Treasury said for every dollar of company tax there's $4 of benefit to the overall economy.

JOURNALIST:

On Medicare, Labor obviously got through to voters with their campaign about what they were accusing you of planning to do if re-elected. Bill Shorten has changed this language now but he still says he won't let you off the hook. Are you concerned that this campaign will affect your campaign in marginal seats?

PRIME MINISTER:

The real issue is that Mr Shorten has been caught out lying, hasn’t he. He has been lying about Medicare and he's been caught out. He was asked to put his hand on his heart and repeat his lies and he wouldn't. He's been caught out lying and he's been lying to older Australians - having people on behalf of the Labor Party and the unions, calling them up in the evening, frightening them with these lies. Now if somebody is running for Prime Minister and they're prepared to lie about something as important as that to vulnerable Australians, how can you trust anything else he says?

Thank you very much.