PRIME MINISTER:

Thank you very much - it’s great to be here at River City Labs. You know, what you guys are doing is building the future of our economy. You’re creating hundreds of jobs. You’re delivering millions of dollars of exports. You’re harnessing the boom, the ideas boom that could go on forever. You know, the mining boom, our great mining boom, the mining construction boom can’t go on forever. We understand that. Your ideas. Your imagination. Your enterprise. That will continue forever as long as you want it to and it’s your enthusiasm, your entrepreneurship that’s making the difference.

30 years ago Lucy and I were in very much the same position as you - starting businesses, coming up with new ideas. Some of them didn’t work but that’s ok – that’s ok because you learn so much from that. And you know, some of the people you hire will not stay with you forever, they’ll go off and start their own businesses and that’s good too.

A workspace like this at River City Labs is absolutely critical. Of course, we can do everything online and I know many of you have got your teams scattered all over Australia – some of them around the world. But you know, we are social animals, human beings and we are more creative when we get together and when we mingle and when we exchange our ideas, compete with each other in the most friendly way of course here in this incubator but none-the-less that’s how we get the greatest degree of entrepreneurship and innovation.

Now, this is absolutely vital for our future as the nation, our ability to remain a high wage generous social welfare first world economy. A lot of people try to suggest there is some conflict between having good government services and business. Believe me without strong businesses, without men and women like you who are creating those businesses then you don’t have the tax base and you don’t have the revenues to pay for all those great services. You are underpinning the future of our economy and at the very heart of it is the science and the technology we’re promoting right across the board – through schools, through STEM in schools making sure our kids have the digital training, the digital education – it will equip them for the 21st century.

But you know, in many ways the most important element of all of this is what Wyatt touched on a moment ago, and it’s a change in attitude. It’s critically important to be able to reimagine the world in the life of the technological possibilities that we have. We have to recognise that the world has changed more rapidly and at a scale than never before – you know, half of the world’s middle class consumers will be in East Asia in a few years. 40 years ago China wasn’t even engaged in the global economy – now it’s the world’s biggest economy. These are gigantic changes. Smart phones, which we all live and rely on which connect us potentially to each other 24/7 all around the world – well the first iPhone came out in 2007 – that’s not so long ago. So this is very rapid change. There’s masses of technology. What is often the limiting fact is technological imagination. Lucy and my old partner Sean Howard with whom we started OzEmail years ago, always used to say that – it was a good point. So that’s what you’re providing. You’re providing above all else the imagination, the idea, the dream, the courage. That’s what you’re providing, that particular Australian brand, imagination and get up and go – taking that technology, building much of it yourself it’s true, but taking it from wherever and then reimagining it and creating the businesses of the future.

Wyatt and I are delighted to be here to support you, to celebrate you. We are backing you right across the board with our Innovation and Science Agenda, with our enterprise tax cuts, supporting small and medium businesses like yours which will become big businesses in due course and over time; they’ll get tax cuts as well. [Laughter] But what we’re doing is ensuring - regrettably for them it’s taking quite a while, over 8 years for the biggest guys to get the tax cut but in the next three years it will be companies with $10 million then $25 million then $50 million turnovers – so we’ve front ended in terms of the tax cuts for smaller businesses, the more entrepreneurial ones, generally almost all Australian owned and very often family owned as well. So we recognise that it’s in your area at the innovative end of the market that the smaller businesses at the end of the market where you get the greatest ambition, the greatest innovation, the greatest lift up in employment.

It’s wonderful to be here. I’m pumped up because what you are doing is driving our economic future. We applaud you. We want to hear from you, let’s have a chat about it.

[Applause]

So red eye you're revolutionising - you're revolutionising engineering. Tell us how you're doing it?

WAYNE GERARD – REDEYE APPS:

We take all the engineering data for everything that is built and if you can imagine there's 40 trillion engineering drawings in the world so we're the first cloud based solution to take all of that and put it in the cloud and make it available so asset owners and the companies that own and operate enterprises are safer, more productive and more efficient. Our clients are the largest mining companies, power and water companies, hospitals, governments, and our clients are all around the world. So we're employing over 30 people here in Brisbane. We're four years old. We're growing really quickly and it's such an exciting time to be a startup in this ecosystem.

PRIME MINISTER:

That is fantastic. So that means if I'm working on a construction of a pipeline or a new plant, I will know because my company uses RedEye, I’ll be able to see on my phone exactly what the latest version of the plan or the design I am meant to be working on is?

WAYNE GERARD:

Absolutely. You can share that with whatever you need to share that with instantly. So the productivity saving there is huge for every industry and that makes all Australian companies competitive.

PRIME MINISTER:

Right, and you have got customers and clients all over the world?

WAYNE GERARD:

Absolutely. Here, North America, Europe – yeah, it's a really exciting time.

PRIME MINISTER:

Australian jobs, Australian technology, exporting across the world.

WAYNE GERARD:

We purposely built a startup here in Brisbane because we want to demonstrate what is possible here in Australia. So we employ all of our developers locally. And so we're creating jobs for people graduating straight from university, we've got people of all ages and disciplines working in startup in a new technology company. So we've got people that used to sell cars now working supporting this emerging technology and servicing customers all over the world.

PRIME MINISTER:

And better outcomes for engineers that are building these plants and pipelines because they will always have the right design at the right time?

WAYNE GERARD:

Absolutely. One of the things that we like to say in the startup ecosystem here is we have got to help everyone to stop thinking about what job their kids are going to do next rather than what problem they're going to solve and what business they're going to create. For us it's really about building an ecosystem, not just a company and demonstrating what is possible in the Australian economy.

PRIME MINISTER:

Fantastic. That is awesome. That’s great, very good, well done!

[Applause]

So, how are you guys going?

DAMON OUDEJANS - PUUNTA:

Good thanks, nice to meet you.

PRIME MINISTER:

Good to see you.

WYATT ROY MP:

What do you guys do?

PUUNTA:

We’re peer to peer social betting. So essentially we lay a wager on just about anything with your friends, share and engage around that socially and actually get paid. We are looking to disrupt the gambling market and move it to more a socially responsible space.

PRIME MINISTER:

Alright. That’s fantastic. How’s it going? How far have you progressed?

DAMON OUDEJANS:

It’s going pretty well. We have got an MVP in the market. We are looking to launch version two hopefully in the next month which is pretty exciting because it’s a vast improvement of what we have at the moment.

PRIME MINISTER:

And you're working here?

DAMON OUDEJANS:

We were working here. We're part of the accelerator program which started October last year, went for six months, finished in March and now we have moved down the road. So we have grown a team and employed our own engineers. So things are moving along.

PRIME MINISTER:

Fantastic. Well, good luck.

DAMON OUDEJANS:

Thanks very much.

PRIME MINISTER:

Very good. Now where is Cohort? There he is. Mark - tell us about your business looking after overseas students. Tell us how you do that?

MARK FLETCHER – COHORT SOLUTIONS:

Yeah, so international students are massive market in Australia. There's over 650,000 international students in Australia; our third largest export industry. So we have a range of products and services for the international students from payments. So we have some students that are studying at UQ that will save over $10,000 in their 4-year medicine degree. So we also broker their health insurance. We send welcome packs out to them offshore so that some of the things that we include in there are a prepaid SIM card so when the students land they get a welcome to Australia text message, their parents know their phone number and they can call and say they've arrived safely. We have a range of products and services. We also deal with other stakeholders in the sector like our universities. That is a pretty key one for us.

PRIME MINISTER:

How many students, overseas students have used your platform now?

MARK FLETCHER:

So far we're almost hitting 30,000 students that have used our platform in four years. So we, interestingly that you're here, we started here with Steve four years ago. As Steve was starting up River City Labs it was basically the time we were launching our business.

PRIME MINISTER:

How many employees?

MARK FLETCHER:

We’ve got over 30 employees.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, that’s fantastic. So what you’re doing - you're exporting an Australian service and you're encouraging and enabling more overseas students to come here and study and of course you say that is our biggest services export.

MARK FLETCHER:

Absolutely, and it's an economic decision for the students. So they can easily go to the US, Canada, the UK, et cetera, but if we can make it a bit cheaper here and all other things equal, we are a more competitive sector.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well done. That is great.

So Sarah, what about fashion?

SARAH TIMMERMAN – BEGINNING BOUTIQUE:

Yeah.

PRIME MINISTER:

Beginning Boutique.

SARAH TIMMERMAN:

We're selling fashion online. We were one of the first online stores in Australia to just sell online - not on eBay or anything else. We have been able to export to countries like China, Russia, America - all over the world.

PRIME MINISTER:

That is great. And continue to grow?

SARAH TIMMERMAN:

Definitely continuing to grow. We are in the 13th fast-starter list for BRW last year which was really exciting and Telstra Small Business of the Year for Queensland. So yeah it's very good.

PRIME MINISTER:

Brilliant. And you are such a great role model because a lot of people say that the tech sector is heavily weighted to men and it's harder for women and girls to get started but you are really forging ahead.

SARAH TIMMERAN:

Yeah, it's always what you make it. I think and always just staying true to what you want to do and the ability that you have- and finding people like Steve who help you to grow and help you to learn which is really exciting.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well done.

SARAH TIMMERMAN:

Thank you very much.

PRIME MINISTER:

Now we had a big challenge in training and we’ve had some of the opportunities for companies to get involved in the cloud in training. Is anyone involved in that sector here?

Great – good to see you. Now tell us about GO1. The importance of the cloud as Wayne just pointed out is that it enables you to bring all of your data together to make it instantly available to everyone in your organisation in real time so that it’s always up to date. Now in-house training is a big challenge – how are you revolutionising that at GO1?

ANDREW BARNES – GO1:

Look in-house training has been a big challenge for global organisations because there is so many different vendors, so many different providers for in-house training. You might have to go to St John Ambulance for a first aid certificate, another organisation for workplace health and safety and yeah further organisations for different trainings so what GO1 does is we provide a market for training. So if you think of Trip Advisor and if you go to one location for finding accommodation or travel recommendations – we do the same for businesses so they can deliver all of their training needs to their staff saving them time, making employees more productive and again education is one of Australia’s biggest exports – we want to be leading where education is heading towards the future.

PRIME MINISTER:

Right, so my firm is one of your customers, I’ve got access to a whole range of training services and my employees can access them on their smart phones whenever?

ANDREW BARNES:

Exactly – iPhone, or iPad, whatever the device, people will be able to access training, not just training that might be set by PowerPoint and a lot of workplaces – that’s sort of the training where it is a painful exercise. We want to make training a really enjoyable, productive, valuable exercise and that’s what we’ve been doing.

PRIME MINISTER:

Fantastic. Well, good luck and well done.

Where’s Tanda? Where is Tasmin? Oh hey, there’s Jake. You guys. Now, talking about the cloud and making things easier to do, one of the biggest issues, particularly for smaller businesses is managing the payroll, isn’t it? And all of that science and obviously companies have whole departments doing it, small business owner in particular has to do it all themselves. Tell us how you have revolutionised that?

JAKE PHILLPOT – TANDA:

We are a system for businesses to work out when their staff are working and how much they get paid so that’s workforce management in terms of rostering, timesheets, attendance and then we have an award interpretation lay out for the Australian industrial relations system on top of that. What we found we’ve been trying to do is when you capture the times people are working, from when people clock into work and they clock out of work, we think we have enough data at that point to automate the whole payroll process and the idea is that businesses can be more productive by knowing when their staff are working, how much they are spending but they are also not wasting time doing day to day stuff.

PRIME MINISTER:

Right, ok. And Tasmin – how have you found the reception from small businesses?

TASMIN TREZISE – TANDA:

Really good. I think for us particularly - really excited about the small business tax cut because what that means is businesses, especially Australian businesses can invest in technology and startups like ours can become stronger. But yeah, really receptive. Australian businesses are very innovative.

PRIME MINISTER:

How long have you two been in business?

TASMIN TREZISE:

Jake and I have known each other since primary school. We met first day at primary school but business – three years.

PRIME MINISTER:

And how many employees now?

JAKE PHILLPOT:

Thirty.

PRIME MINISTER:

Thirty employees. Growth and jobs. That’s what it is all about. You’re doing it. That’s fantastic. Well done.

Tell me about GreenSocks.

ANDREA MARTIN - GREENSOCKS:

Ah, yes Prime Minister, GreenSocks is a market place for lawn mowing. So we have lawn mowing guys find jobs. We help customers because you don’t have to wait at home for a lawn mowing quote. You just hope on your phone right now and get your lawn mowed.

PRIME MINISTER:

Just on the way in I had to get my [inaudible]

ANDREA MARTIN:

That’s true.

[Laughter]

PRIME MINISTER:

How’s it going?

ANDREA MARTIN:

We’ve done nearly 1,000 jobs. The accelerator programme has been fantastic and we’ve got about 350 mowing clients. [Inaudible]

PRIME MINISTER:

Well done, good luck.

How are you going? Tell me about Obzervr.

TANIA WATERS – OBZERVR:

Obzervr is a software service – so cloud based service management tool. We are disrupting the traditional way for paper based method of capturing data when you work out in the field.

So, environment saddening or asset management with regards to when you go and do calibration on your equipment. I met you at the springboard last week in Sydney. So the current way of doing that is on paper. Capturing what samples do I need to do or what is the asset doing so we put that on a phone or a tablet for them and we implement the compliance and the standard operating procedure into the work flow that this person has to use in the field.

PRIME MINISTER:

So again, it is the capacity of the cloud to make data universally available in real time.

TANIA WATERS:

Correct – I’m so glad you used that because our slogan is actually ‘reimagining a new way of field work using the cloud data and mobility’

PRIME MINISTER:

Well it is - that’s the revolution isn’t it. Yea I think I’ve got one here. [Laughter] That’s the revolution. The high speed connectivity, connectivity to a device, a personal device, a smart phone for everyone. Storage being very, very cheap, and all of that. That basically is the package.

TANIA WATERS:

And indeed it’s also because we create a work flow for the person. So the world that we’re in, in terms of sampling and compliance and asset management it’s quite a complicated work process but if we build that in to the work flow, the person that can actually do this job now in North or remote Queensland, where ever they may be. You can actually now take graduates or older people who are not necessarily, you know, haven’t been through five years of understanding how this all works, but you’re pre-populating the work that they now they have to do. So you can actually start employing. It creates more employability for those people because now it’s already there for them. They just have to follow the steps.

PRIME MINISTER:

How big is your - ?

TANIA WATERS:

So we have three permanent employees and we have just got some investment. Our first round of investment. So we have to get another three or four in terms of software developers, business development.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well fantastic, congratulations.

[Applause]

Now come over to this side. What about Faith? Sixpivot?

FAITH REES - SIXPIVOT:

So Sixpivot is a cloud consulting business so we help a lot of the companies in the room actually move and start their software journey in the cloud. We also have a product called Cloud Control which helps you compare your public cloud providers and also understand how much it is actually going to cost you to move workloads to the cloud.

PRIME MINISTER:

Now you’ve been in the tech sector for a long time?

FAITH REES:

I have.

PRIME MINISTER:

This is your first business of your own?

FAITH REES:

Yes.

PRIME MINISTER:

Right. So you’ve struck out - enterprise, entrepreneurship. How long have you been going?

FAITH REES:

Just under 12 months. July 1 is 12 months.

PRIME MINISTER:

Right fantastic. So how big is the team now?

FAITH REES:

So we’re 14 person staff now and looking to grow to double that over the next 12 months.

PRIME MINISTER:

That’s very, very rapid growth. Well good luck.

FAITH REES:

Thank you.

PRIME MINISTER:

Fantastic. Thank you.

[Applause]

Now hello. Tell us about your business.

ROBERT MCLEAY – DOSE ME:

So DoseMe is about personalised medicine. So what we do is calculate the right dose of the drug for a specific individual patient. So rather than dosing yourself or myself based on the average person in the population and let’s face it, you’re not average, I’m not average. There really is no such thing.

PRIME MINISTER:

Sure – you’re right. Everyone is unique. That’s personalised medicine. We were talking about it yesterday in the context of genomes and Zero Children’s Cancer Initiative.

ROBERT MCLEAY:

Yeah I saw that on Twitter yesterday actually. Really pleasing to see. But when you do calculate the right dose of a drug for an individual you get fantastic benefits. So in some patient groups that’s a halving of mortality. For other patient groups such as childhood leukaemia, that’s increasing survival by 15 per cent. We’re not talking about doing any more tests than what are currently done. So it really is taking the tools, tests and doctors that we have in our fantastic healthcare system and just helping them to use some of the tools and information that they have in a more precise and individual way.

PRIME MINISTER:

And what brought you into this? What was your journey that got you into this innovative business?

ROBERT MCLEAY:

Well my background is actually science. So I studied, did a PHD at one of the research institutes at UQ. I serendipitously met a co-founder over a barbecue. And got talking.

PRIME MINISTER:

So that was a barbecue starter - not a barbecue stopper.

[Laughter]

ROBERT MCLEAY:

Yeah and it all went from there. And we’ve just grown the team. So in the last two weeks we have hired six more full time staff and we’ve now moved out in to our own larger set of offices. Things are moving on and it’s really encouraging to see all the government support for startups and innovation.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well that’s fantastic. How many patients are part of your network now?

ROBERT MCLEAY:

That’s a little bit hard to say but probably in the thousands. We don’t have that data immediately on hand but it would be thousands across a range of drugs from chemotherapy, to transplant, to immunosuppression, to antibiotics.

PRIME MINISTER:

How does the use of cloud technology - how does that enable you to do this? Whereas ten years ago you wouldn’t have been able to do it?

ROBERT MCLEAY:

So it really is about delivering the complexity of this technology in a simple form into the hands of doctors, clinicians, pharmacists. Whether that be at their desk or at the bedside. So we support mobile devices, phones, tablets, we have a web base interface as well and it is all cloud hosted so we can scale up as we need depending upon demand.

PRIME MINISTER:

Do you see a – obviously medicine is highly regulated. Do you see the prospect of going offshore with this product as well?

ROBERT MCLEAY:

Yes so we are a regulated medical device because we are making recommendations to change a dose for a patient. We are listed on the ARTG in Australia, so essentially we are clear here. We’ve seen a market in Europe, and touch wood very shortly I will have [inaudible] as well.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well what an amazing export. Creating jobs.

[Applause]

I mean this is again, as I was saying about yesterday, you know, the point you make about chemo is right - that’s part of the Zero Children’s Cancer Initiative is to identify the character of particular cancers so that you can hit them with precisely the right chemo and the right dose that does as little harm to the rest of the patient. This is another angle on the same concept of personalisation.

ROBERT MCLEAY:

I mean it’s really critical to get the dose right. If you don’t give enough dose the patient stays sicker for longer and if you give too much you have side effects. So not surprisingly when you do individualised dosing you don’t just gain patient outcome benefits but you also gain significant cost savings as well. For some groups of patients that’s up to a reduction of up to ten days in hospital. So really significant both at the individual patient level and at the health level.

PRIME MINISTER:

So you’ve got doctors working with you?

ROBERT MCLEAY:

Yes so we have doctors and pharmacists working with us on that. Our flagship site is St Vincent’s Hospital in Sydney - they are absolutely fantastic to work with.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well that’s great. I might meet you there, it’s in my electorate - it’s in my hood. [Laughter]

Do you want to talk about River City Labs or what you’re up to?

PABLO FARIAS NAVARRO - ZENVA:

Yes. I’m actually the newest employee of River City Labs.

PRIME MINISTER:

Oh the newest employee there you go. [Laughter] Drumroll… [Laughter]

PABLO FARIAS NAVARRO:

I got the job four weeks ago. I really appreciate what you’re doing. I’m actually an international student myself and being privileged to see the tremendous support from the government is completely different from in my country and being in a startup and getting a lot of support to grow and develop has been a privilege, so thank you.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well thank you very much.

[Applause]

PABLO FARIAS NAVARRO:

I’m an entrepreneur here at River City Labs. My startup is called Zenva and we teach online coding skills, so we teach individuals who want to…

PRIME MINISTER:

Come around here so everyone can see you. Sorry what’s your name?

PABLO FARIAS NAVARRO:

My name is Pablo and our startup is Zenva, we teach online how to build games, how to build apps on a website for people who want to upskill and learn programming. That’s where the main skills are required in a lot of new jobs.

PRIME MINISTER:

It certainly is.

PABLO FARIAS NAVARRO:

And now we are starting to get interest from schools as well so we are working on coding software for high schools. We have a couple of schools using it and that’s our new project.

PRIME MINISTER:

Fantastic, well good luck Pablo. You’re right here at River City Labs?

PABLO FARIAS NAVARRO:

Ah yes. I am right here as well. Also I come from overseas and I have to say that starting a business in Australia has been a great experience - I’ve seen very little red tape compared to my home country.

PRIME MINISTER:

Where is that?

PABLO FARIAS NAVARRO:

I don’t want to say.

[Laughter]

PRIME MINISTER:

Okay, very good Pablo. Good luck, thank you.

[Applause]

I thought Wayne - can we get you back again?

WAYNE GERARD:

Sure.

PRIME MINISTER:

Wayne your business is, you talked about it, it will promote better projects, safer projects with lower costs in construction, but just at the social level - you’ve had a number of people who have worked for you who have gone on and started their own businesses. This is this innovation ecosystem that you walk about. This change in culture so that more of us are encouraged to strike out and have a go and take that enterprising approach that Tasmin was talking about. Certainly my Government is absolutely committed to because we see that as a critical element of our economic future. But just talk about those people that came then went off to do their own thing.

WAYNE GERARD:

I think the whole startup ecosystem is an ecosystem where it focuses on this kind of energy of ‘give before you get’ and helping to build people’s skills and capacity, training them in new areas and then giving them the confidence to go and start their own thing and learn, you know, create their own journey. So we’ve had five startups spin out of Red Eye so that’s five new companies in the community that are also employing new people.

PRIME MINISTER:

Here at River City?

WAYNE GERARD:

Yeah, here at River City. They’re solving a whole range of problems from consumer related problems – you know one guy is solving, or providing a solution where he’s encouraging people to ride bikes to work as opposed to you know driving, which is helping to improve fitness and the economy.

Another guy has spun out a startup which is all about improving the way that you manage buildings and smart buildings. So for us at RedEye we are all about reinventing how people work. I think that what we’re seeing is people are coming into the ecosystem learning skills and then having the confidence to go and start something new. So it’s a really exciting time to be in a startup here in Australia.

PRIME MINISTER:

Exactly that innovation culture, ecosystem, whatever you call it, it’s that change of attitude, that preparedness to do things differently and look at problems afresh, isn’t it?

WAYNE GERARD:

Yeah I think it’s the entire economy, Australia as a whole, we have this aversion to risk. What we’re seeing is people are gaining confidence by looking at all the startups that are around here are great examples of people taking risks, getting traction and demonstrating that it’s possible and that’s encouraging. The oldest guy that worked at RedEye was 65 years old right and I think that startups offer a number of benefits to the economy from diversity to development, learning on the job and new skills. Really we were at a conference on the weekend, it was all about kids and helping kids to get interested in startups and so we had five or six of my team there teaching kids about the basics of coding. There must have been 600 to 700 kids now thinking about looking at startups and a really viable alternative to a traditional job. So creating new businesses and becoming a knowledge economy or a digital economy means that we get to export our product and services internationally. That’s revenue, that’s more jobs, that’s a more sustained lifestyle. For me I think we all want our kids to have a great job in the future, we want an economy that’s prosperous and you know your tax reform, the entrepreneurial visa program you guys are talking about, these are really important initiatives that will create a sustainable Australian economy going forward.

PRIME MINISTER:

That’s what it’s all about. Thank you so much well done.

[Applause]

So Steve - you’re the founder. We’re in your place here at River City Labs. Tell us about your story and what you’re doing here.

STEVE BAXTER:

We’ve got a bit of a shared history at OzEmail Prime Minister as well.

PRIME MINISTER:

Yeah that’s right, the old days.

STEVE BAXTER:

So River City Labs it’s not for profit, it’s about being the clubhouse it’s about helping out. So with the announcement this morning regarding the incubators and accelerators programme – really heartening for all of the companies that you have spoken to this morning have been through accelerators here or overseas – which is fantastic. Even better that three of those I have invested in which is fantastic [laughter]. So what’s really nice about the last sort of, since you became Prime Minister is the change in language and the change in attitude towards innovation and startups. You’ve got the various early-stage tax offsets and tax incentives, so not just entrepreneurs but there is also examples of venture capital and in the room we’ve got full circle capital with a brand new VC firm in Brisbane as well, they’re coming out of the woodwork at the same time. But I reckon you get far more value talking to people than talking to me. I’ve got a couple of things to give you. First up the black one. The black one first. So this is a River City Labs t-shirt. It’s got Prime Minister on the back. There you go.

[Laughter]

PRIME MINISTER:

Oh it says: ‘Prime Minister’! There you go.

STEVE BAXTER:

And considering it is State of Origin [inaudible] – there you go.

[Laughter]

Thank you for coming down. You have all heard enough from me. I talk too much at pressers so thank you for coming down. Thanks for chatting to voters and we really appreciate it.

[Applause]

PRIME MINISTER:

Very good, well done.