Well good morning. What a fantastic example of our economic plan in action. Here we have a small Australian business a few years ago had two employees now has 26. A craft beer operation serving the Australian market and now reaching out to the world thanks to the Free Trade Agreements the big export trade agreements we have negotiated. This is the sort of business, the scale of business that will benefit from the 1st of July, from the enterprise tax cuts set out in our economic plan, set out in the Budget.

It's a very inspiring place to be and I hope Max’s example, as I said earlier, will be taken up by many other businesses. As he said, many businesses, small Australian businesses, say ‘wow, those big export markets, they're too big, too big for us to take on’. Max shows what an example he is of being able to do that and I hope that others will follow his lead. We're certainly encouraging them to do so.

Australian enterprise coupled with a strong economic plan, drives the way to more jobs and more growth. Now speaking of trade, I should note that I've had a good discussion this morning with President Obama on a range of global and regional issues, one of which was the progress of the Trans Pacific Partnership trade deal which, as you know, is another one of the big trade deals that has been agreed it has to be ratified by the Congress.

The President is confident it can be ratified before the end of the year. So we're very encouraged by that. We talked about the security situation in the Middle East and the President briefed me on developments there from his perspective and I did the same from ours. He thanked Australia for what he described as our extraordinary contribution to the battle against ISIL and Daesh. We also talked about security issues in our region and confirmed our strong commitment to freedom of navigation throughout the region and the importance of any territorial disputes being resolved peacefully and in accordance with international law.

The President thanked Australia for our commitment at the Paris climate conference and we committed each other to both our nations continuing to support the achievement of those targets that had been agreed by all the nations of the world at that very important conference.

The President and I also discussed the very serious issue of the over-production of steel globally, the steel glut. We talked about the impact this was having on steelmakers in the US - in his country - and in Australia. We discussed the position in Whyalla as a very highlighted example of the challenges that we're facing through these very low steel prices. Now the President and I have agreed that Australia and the United States will intensify our collaboration to ensure that the overproduction of steel is addressed.

I've also raised this issue, I should say, with the Chinese leaders, in particular with Premier Li, who undertook and has committed publicly as well to reducing China's steel production by 150 million tonnes a year.

So there is a lot of strong intentions but we need to address this issue because it is important that the viability of steelmakers in our country and in the United States and other nations, is preserved and not undermined by the exporting or the dumping of very cheap steel made in places where it is being produced at way below the real cost.

So that was a very good discussion with the President and we touched on a number of other issues but those were among the leading ones.

JOURNALIST:

Prime Minister, the Labor Party in WA has dis-endorsed its candidate for Freo, do you have 100 per cent confidence in the process the Liberal Party uses to vet its candidates?

PRIME MINISTER:

We have a very rigorous process.

JOURNALIST:

Are you happy being named in the Mossack Fonseca files?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well can I just say to you that as the article acknowledged, there is no suggestion of any impropriety whatsoever. There is nothing new there. The company concerned was a wholly owned subsidiary of a public listed Australian company. So an ASX listed company, of which Neville Wran and I were both directors for about two years. So the involvement is very, very well known and as the article acknowledges, there's no suggestion of any impropriety at all.

JOURNALIST:

Prime Minister will you be campaigning with Tony Abbott over the next seven weeks?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well can I just say to you that Mr Abbott is campaigning for the return of the Turnbull Government and if the occasion arises, no doubt we can. We may be able to campaign together in Warringah in his electorate.

JOURNALIST:

Prime Minister, there's a very bad Newspoll for the Liberals in WA today, can I get your reaction to that and are you concerned about the federal implications?

PRIME MINISTER:

Can I just say to you I'm not going to comment on polls, let alone polls on state governments. But I'm focused on the federal election. I have to just make this observation, that Colin Barnett has provided strong and capable leadership for the people of Western Australia for many years now.

JOURNALIST:

What's your response to claims that the youth PaTH program is illegal because it underpays workers?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well, the claims are baseless. I think it is a matter of shame that the Labor Party and the unions would seek to block a program that has been welcomed by the welfare sector, by the Brotherhood of St Lawrence, by ACOSS, by people right across the spectrum. Not normally people who endorse every program proposed by a Coalition Government. They've welcomed it because they know what it will do is ensure that young men and women, who are struggling to get a job, will get a start. It is the pathway to employment. Youth unemployment is one of our biggest challenges. We are committed to jobs and growth and this PaTH program will provide 120,000 young people with the opportunity to get into work, get the experience of work and become employable over the next four years.

So they should be supporting it. But look, Bill Shorten never talks about creating jobs. He promises lots of spending. He doesn't tell you where he's going to fund it from, he doesn't tell you how he's going to fill in his black hole. But the one thing he has no plan for at all, is jobs. Everything we have in our economic plan, from the enterprise tax cuts that will benefit this business and so many others, from the export trade deals that will benefit, that have benefitted this business and will benefit so many others, everything we have is designed to and will create more economic growth and more jobs. You can see an example of it right here, right here with this firm, this is an example of what's happening right around Australia.

We are driving, creating, supporting Australian business men and women in building their businesses, stronger growth and more jobs.

JOURNALIST:

Speaking of this brewery, this is a craft beer brewery, do you drink beer or are you more of a wine man? Do you have a favourite type of craft beer?

PRIME MINISTER:

I do drink beer, I do that’s right and I prefer a lager.

JOURNALIST:

Prime Minister, the NSW Government has backtracked on some of its proposed council amalgamations. Given the Nats have really made this a federal issue now, have you spoken to Mike Baird, do you have confidence in his decision and have your senior colleagues spoken on this issue with Mike Baird?

PRIME MINISTER:

This is very much a matter for the State Government. The local government is entirely under the jurisdiction of the State Government.

JOURNALIST:

Barnaby Joyce has made many comments about that. You can't just have your Deputy Prime Minister openly commenting on it and brush away that question.

PRIME MINISTER:

Well everyone's entitled to express an opinion. I'm the Prime Minister of Australia, this is very much a matter for the Premier and the Government of NSW.

JOURNALIST:

Will the Government be taking any further action against 7-Eleven given the developments?

PRIME MINISTER:

We are, as Michaelia Cash has said. We are certainly going to ensure that the law is enforced there. This is a big issue, it's quite plain that the measures the Labor Party proposed will not have any impact.

JOURNALIST:

Prime Minister, what do you make of George Christensen saying no Syrian refugees from the extra intake should be settled in his region? He said it yesterday.

PRIME MINISTER:

I understand that Mr Christensen was expressing a view about - he is concerned about the economic downturn in his region and he is concerned that the introduction, if you like, of people coming through the humanitarian program would come into a region where there aren't enough jobs. That's the basis on which he's made that observation, as he's advised me.

JOURNALIST:

So it’s fair to say Star Technology is paying its fair share of tax in Australia? You were a director, or in a tax haven?

PRIME MINISTER:

Let me say to you that the company of which Neville Wran and I were directors, was an Australian listed company and had it made any profits - which it did not, regrettably - it certainly would have paid tax in Australia. But, obviously you haven't studied the accounts of the company concerned.

JOURNALIST:

George Christensen - do you think he has a point?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well George Christensen is entitled, he is expressing an opinion about his own community. What he is saying, as I understand it from George, is that in his community there has been a downturn in the economy because of the downturn in the mining construction boom. That's happened in a number of big cities in North Queensland, as you know, Townsville being another example, of course. What he's saying is because there aren't a lot of jobs around, it's better for refugees who come in the humanitarian program to be located in places where there are more opportunities for work. That is, George is entitled to express an opinion about his own area. But plainly the objective, when you bring in refugees into Australia, indeed any arrivals into Australia, is to put them in a position where they are given the skills and the opportunities to get into work. That is the whole objective.

JOURNALIST:

When will you intend to visit a shopping centre or a street walk to meet some voters outside of these carefully stage managed opportunities?

PRIME MINISTER:

Well I look forward to that. I'm sorry you weren't able to join us yesterday on the train. There were lots of voters on the train and I am getting out and about all around the country.

JOURNALIST:

Did you catch the train this morning?

PRIME MINISTER:

No, I did not, I did not get the train this morning. In fact there isn't a train station at Mornington.

JOURNALIST:

There is to Frankston.

PRIME MINISTER:

There is to Frankston. That’s right.

JOURNALIST:

What do you make of your visit to this seat which is obviously held by outgoing Bruce Bilson on 5.5%. There's some concern within the party that the demographics in this area are moving against the Liberal Party, are you worried about Victoria and this seat?

PRIME MINISTER:

What I'm concerned about is ensuring that right across the country our candidates get my support and the support of my Ministers. Because it is absolutely vital for the future of Australia, for the prospects of our children and grandchildren, that we are re-elected and that we are able to implement and bring into full force, carry out entirely our national economic plan. You're seeing it here, an example of what our plan is delivering. Trade deals, export trade deals opening up markets, which this company, a small Australian company is able to exploit. It's able to grow its business beyond Australia and what does that do? Economic growth here, more jobs here. This is an example. This is how our national economic plan is working.

We have a plan for jobs and growth. We are the only party in this election, the only party in this election which has a plan for jobs and growth. You mentioned Barnaby Joyce a moment ago. Together the Liberal Party, the National Party, the LNP, together the Coalition has set out a plan for jobs and growth and you're surrounded by the proof of it right here and right across Australia that proof can be found.

Thank you all very much.